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Renowned Oklahoma Artist and Grateful Patient Donates Sculpture

In June 2010, lung transplant hopeful Harold T. Holden was roughly two weeks away from losing his battle with a debilitating lung disease and had nearly lost hope of a miracle. He settled accounts, closed his Enid studio and grieved the loss of watching his grandchildren grow. And then the phone rang.

“Second chances mean everything to our family,” said Holden. “I was about as close as you can get to dying when we got that call. So, to wake up after surgery with a new lung, not needing oxygen and essentially being given a second chance is overwhelming. Our grandchildren are two years older today and I’m back in the studio enjoying life every day.”

Holden underwent a successful single lung transplant in July 2010, at the INTEGRIS Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute. The nearly six hour procedure involved seven members of Holden’s transplant team.

To honor his life-saving experience at INTEGRIS and in tribute to organ donor families, Holden presented a recasting of a six-foot sculpture titled “Thank You Lord,” which depicts a life-sized cowboy standing with his hand over his heart, hand extended, thanking God for his blessings.

The statue, formally presented to the INTEGRIS family in a morning ceremony, united the Holdens, their transplant care team, physicians, INTEGRIS administrators, employees and board members. The statue will be on permanent display in the emergency department cul-de-sac near the northwest corner of the INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center complex.

“This sculpture expresses our gratefulness to INTEGRIS for the new life that we have been given,” said Holden and his wife, Edna Mae. “Throughout this journey we tried to be strong in our faith and this sculpture is simply our expression of just that, not only for us, but for all of the gifts that the Lord provides: comfort, care, new life and hope.”

“We deeply appreciate this expression of thanks from Mr. Holden that will stand as a beacon of hope to all who enter our walls for care at INTEGRIS Baptist Medical Center,” said Bruce Lawrence, INTEGRIS president and chief executive officer. “Today we honor a grateful transplant recipient, celebrate his transplant team and pay tribute to the life-saving second chances afforded to us by organ donors.”

More than 100,000 Americans were awaiting lifesaving organ transplants in 2010; 800 of them were Oklahomans.

“Our team is honored to have played a role in the successful outcome of Mr. Holden’s transplant,” said James Long, M.D, cardiothoracic surgeon and medical director of INTEGRIS Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute. “Organ donation is truly lifesaving. One organ donor has the potential to save up to eight lives, and we appreciate the Holdens’ generosity which pays tribute to this ideal and also fosters greater awareness of the importance of organ donation.”

Primarily known as a cowboy artist, Harold “H” Holden has captured the west in sculptures and paintings for more than 35 years. His works can be found in the Oklahoma State Capitol, National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum, Oklahoma Historical Society, Oklahoma State University, and even on a U.S. postage stamp. Harold and Edna Mae Holden live near Kremlin, just north of Enid.

“Mr. Holden truly understands and embraces the concept of philanthropy,” said Brad Walker, INTEGRIS Foundation executive director. “He is keenly aware of the significant, positive impact donor support provides for a not-for-profit organization like INTEGRIS, and we are humbled to accept this sculpture which will always serve as a reminder of a gift that was paid forward.”

About INTEGRIS Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute

The INTEGRIS Nazih Zuhdi Transplant Institute lauds some of the best organ transplant physicians and surgeons in the region, performing heart, kidney, lung, liver, pancreas and small bowel transplantation. The institute also benefits from a dedicated organ transplant intensive care unit with highly skilled, full-time critical care specialists and nurses. Learn more about this incredible team at integristransplant.com.

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